Interview with Tomoko Chris

July 22nd, 2015

クリスさん写真

Profile:

Born in Hawaii, May 1st, 1971. Raised in Yokohama, where she attended Midorigaoka High School.

Enrolled in Sophia University’s Faculty of Comparative Culture and graduated with a major in Sociology.

Upon graduation, began professional activities at Tokyo FM radio station J-WAVE. Since then, has continued working in radio and other industries in roles related to communication and expression, including television narrator, lyricist, and writer. In recent years, primary focus has been on planning and running programs showcasing art and design. Eldest son born in 2011.

プロフィール:

1971年5月1日 ハワイ生まれ横浜育ち

神奈川県立横浜緑が丘高校

上智大学比較文化学部 卒業(社会学専攻)

大学卒業と同時に、東京のFMラジオ J-WAVEで活動開始以来、ラジオを中心に、テレビナレーション、作詞、執筆など、伝達、表現分野で活動中。近年は、主にアートやデザインに特化した番組を企画、担当。2011年に長男出産。

 

“Talking” as a vocation

Q: Tell me about what you do for a living, and how you got into that line of work.

A: Most of my work is in radio. I’m an MC at J-WAVE. A “personality” — at J-WAVE, they say “navigator.” I originally got the job through a personal introduction rather than via a DJ contest. I had an interest in media, and also in expressive fields like theater and music. But I’m what’s called a “half” — my father is American and my mother is Japanese — and considering my upbringing and the way I relate to those around me, I didn’t think I was really suited to be an actor or singer in Japan myself.

Q: You mean because, for example, the way people perceive you would limit you to certain roles?

A: Right. These days there are even “half” television announcers, but when I was about to graduate college, the only “half” presences on TV were the anchorperson on CNN Headline News, the person who reads the bilingual news, that sort of thing. I didn’t think of my bilingualism as anything other than part of my individuality, so I wasn’t hoping to use it to get work.

The work I ended up doing suited me very well, I think, in terms of the perspective I ultimately hold, the way I relate to people, what I want to do with my life. I started to feel this way maybe ten years into my career. For example, I think I’m good at listening to people’s stories, and when I realized that I could express my individuality by how I responded to those stories, it seemed to me a way to make use of my position, my standpoint in my work.

Q: That’s quite a tenacious attitude. Ten years not sure about what you were doing…

A: To be honest, right after I graduated from university I spent a year doing it once a week. I couldn’t even turn that down. People told me I should do a program, gave me the push I needed to take the leap, but I didn’t know how to swim, if you see what I mean. It was a program with no script and a lot of guests. But I thought that was normal. I didn’t know how other programs did it. When people said “I don’t know how you do it without a script,” my reaction was “Huh? Other programs have a script?!” (laughs)

So I was on once a week for the first year, a weekly two-hour live broadcast, and after each one finished I’d spend the time until the next one brooding over how I could improve. Then in the second year — I was originally on Thursdays — they asked me to do a show every weekday, Monday to Friday. I was, like, “What?!” And that was the second year. But I hadn’t started by making a real commitment to this, and so in the third year I actually said I wanted to quit. After that, after I quit, I was listening casually to the radio and thinking “If that were me, I’d say it like this,” and I realized that I was listening to it as someone who had experience doing it. All at once I was able to process what I’d been doing in those live broadcasts every day, like, “So that’s what I wanted to do.” Some time later, when another opportunity came my way, I thought “Maybe I could do it now,” and started broadcasting again.

Q: Do you mean that something had changed within yourself, that you could now start again? Or did you decide based on the people you’d be working with, like your staff were going to be the same as last time, for example?

A: I think it was about timing. Because I also felt that I would do the job with a clear idea of what I wanted this time.

Q: How long a hiatus was it?

A: I was doing other work, but my hiatus from broadcasting was about two years, I guess?

Q: Other jobs that involved talking?

A: That’s right. Narration and so on.

Q: So you had a sense that talking would be your work from now on?

A: Hmm… I suppose so… The thing is, broadcasting live is very raw, very intimate in some ways, which makes it unlike other work, but I did like using words. I also like writing. I wanted to keep doing work where I could produce words, sounds, that sort of thing.

Q: And you’ve had this career now for…?

A: Just over twenty years.

Q: How long ago was your son born?

A: Um… about three and a half years ago. December 2011, when I was forty.

 

A job with no guarantees; no concerns about how things will be after giving birth

 

Q: Among the people I know, particularly freelancers, there are several who want children but can’t bring themselves to make the leap because what will happen to their career afterwards is so unclear. It’s partly related to the type of employment, but I know company employees who feel the same way. Didn’t you have any anxiety or concern about that?

Q: Not at all, and that’s the truth. It wasn’t that I myself wanted a child no matter what, more that I just thought it would be more fun if I had one. But I had so many other things going on every day that I never thought backwards about where I’d have to draw the line to have a child, not even once. That probably applies not just to having children but also to the way I live my life, the way I think and so on.

Q: So you didn’t worry too much before having your child about what would happen to your career afterwards?

A: No, I didn’t. I didn’t see any point in it. On the work side, I got out of live broadcasting and went back to stage one. I was wondering when I would get back into it, or if I would never do it again. To be honest, I was half expecting that outcome. I like work, and it’s something you need, but if the child wasn’t healthy I wouldn’t be able to work any more. I didn’t think it was fair to make promises to people before I gave birth about how things would be afterwards

Q: Now that you’re raising a child, and sometimes you have to, for example, finish work in time to go get them from somewhere — well, if you put it unpleasantly, children are a burden, right? Of course, having that burden is what lets you use your time effectively, but they do make things difficult. They’re very precious and important, but still.

A: Yes, that doesn’t make things any less difficult. That doesn’t change.

Q: (laughs)

A: As for what specifically is difficult… I suppose the most difficult thing is your own feelings. Like, I want to work, but spending time with my child is important, this time is so valuable, the best present you can give your child is time. I heard that once and it really resonated with me. My partner and I are raising our child with both of us working, and there are no doubts about that. But when my child was born, I did want to be with him, you know? But I also don’t think I’m really suited to staying at home together with him.

Q: Yes, yes.

A: It comes in waves. Dealing with those waves within yourself is I think the most difficult thing, to be honest. So perhaps the difficult thing is managing your time and managing your feelings.

Just recently I went to Okinawa for three days for work, and it was kind of a surprise to realize that since I was there for work all I had to do was work. I didn’t have to wash or clean, or worry about time.

I suppose I just love work. And I’m very glad to be able to immerse myself so much in my work. Of course your child’s health is a requirement there. When he was born, I wondered if I would ever be able to work again. Just holding this, how can I put it, fragile little thing.

Q: How were the first three months? I hardly slept at all after giving birth to my first child. They were constantly waking up. At night, looking at my husband asleep, the tears would just start to flow… (laughs)

A: “How dare you just lie there sleeping?” (laughs)

Q: What kind of child was your son?

A: Well, it wasn’t that bad for me. But yes, I was tired, of course.

Q: You can only sleep in little snatches here and there, right?

A: Well, I’m physically quite tough, so… But it is rough not to be able to get sleep when you need it. Three hours would be enough, but just when you try to go to sleep you get woken up. I had created a way of living, to an extent, before I got married and before I gave birth, and I think without a power that forceful nothing would have changed.

After having a child, I think it’s incredibly important to have the kind of relationships at work where you can discuss things with people. There were a lot of people, even men that I hadn’t spoken with much before, who would stop by to chat about kid things. I remember being surprised but very happy. They seemed to understand how tough the role of mother is, and I might have gone ahead and interpreted that as rooting for me (laughs). Just thinking that we were all supporting each other in our work. I think it’s good manners to not want to cause difficulties at work, and it is important to draw a line there, but my impression has been that if you just talk to people many will try to understand.

Q: For me, I worry about how much to say. For example, I’m scheduled to call England tonight, and their nine o’clock in the morning is Japan’s five in the evening, so if I start the call then I won’t make it to childcare in time. But if you get the kids home, feed them dinner, and get them to bed before  you make the call, the only time you can discuss things is in the middle of the night. So the question is how much to tell. Do I say that I’m a mother, so I can’t call except after eleven o’clock at night Japan time? Or do I just say I can talk after ten o’clock at night without giving a reason? It’s difficult.

A: Is this someone you work with a lot?

Q: I’ve worked with this production company before, but my contact changes each project, so I only started dealing with this person a month ago.

A: It’s tricky. It’s hard to say right up front, isn’t it? Sometimes, to be honest, I wish they could see what it’s like for me outside of work, for example if we could dinner together. But I don’t think it’s about trying to get treated more indulgently, more because you definitely don’t people to think “Well, they have kids, so I guess this is the best they can do” about the results you produce. If you tell them, they might be able to bend the schedule for you, for example, but the other side of that is that you’re promising to do the job properly. If you speak out, you bear more responsibility. But if you have good personal relationships, people do try to understand by nature. I think it’s fair to say that the addition of this extra thing called “children” gives you a shared language with people at your work.

To completely change the subject, when I was in Itoman, Okinawa for work a long time ago, I went to the war memorial and museum. One of the things I heard there was — if a baby is born while you’re hiding in a trench from air raids, it will cry, right? And if it cries, they will find out where you are. So mothers were apparently told to smother their babies. I can’t get that story out of my head. It makes me realize how lucky we are that when children are born and cry at night, they’re allowed to cry, when this other thing happened once, and maybe is still happening somewhere. In those terms, we’re living very sheltered lives, and I sometimes think about how minuscule those concerns about balancing work and raising children really are. It makes you think, but, well, we don’t go hungry. Striving to become a more appealing person is closer to my ideal.

Q: You had the ideal before you even had your child, I suppose.

A: Yes, maybe so. To backtrack a bit, my feeling is that what we perceive when we’re young becomes central to how we think later. We moved house a lot, which sometimes meant leaving regardless of whether I’d made friends or started some after-school activity — so whatever goals I set for myself, sometimes there was nothing I could do to meet them. But on the other hand, I was able to adapt and get along without problems wherever I ended up. I like the idea of a sort of fog coming over the scene before you, and then, when that clears up, realizing that you’re now somewhere really nice. Perhaps because I thought that way when I was little. So, maybe I didn’t arrive at this way of thinking because of giving birth.

Q: What time do you pick up your son [from school]?

A: The school bus normally comes for him at around nine in the morning, and then he comes back at three in the afternoon. I try to be there by then, but sometimes I can’t, and those times he stays longer at daycare. So, right now it ends up being about three o’clock most of the time, and four-thirty or five-thirty one or two times a week, I guess.

Q: Three o’clock would mean that you have to really compress your work, if you also have a lunch break. You welcome them home, spend some time with them, and then it’s time to make dinner.

A: Yes, that’s very true.

Q: That’s the thing that exhausts me (laughs).

A: It is pretty exhausting (laughs).

Q: Once, my husband came home at around nine o’clock at night, just when the kids were brushing their teeth, and when I asked him to help he said he’d just come home from work and he at least wanted to eat dinner in peace first. And my response was, wait a minute, do you think I eat my dinner in peace, with two children at the table too? (laughs)

A: I know just what you mean. I broadcast live on Saturdays, so on Saturday the kids are with their father. He’s a super positive person, so he said, “It’ll be fine, I can do it.” But if he was a woman, he’d cook and do the dishes as well as watch the kids, but since he’s a man, when I come home it’s just chaos. I appreciate that he watches the kids, but still…

Q: I’ve been there too (laughs).

A: I don’t think you should complain about how people do things, but you know, all the worries come my way.

Q: If you tell [a man] to do something, he’ll do it, but it doesn’t occur to them to do anything otherwise. “I do this every day, why doesn’t he notice?” Do you talk to your husband about this?

A: Oh, yes, yes. Although, I’m not very good at saying things in small doses. I say it all at once, which apparently makes it impossible for him to take it all in (laughs). But I do think you have to consider how to say things. Like, “Okay, I want him to do things this way — what’s the best way of saying things to achieve that?”

Q: I have to use finesse there too. But I end up just getting irritated and coming out with it (laughs).

A: Well, I do too. It’s an ideal, really. But in the end, even if I quit my job and stayed home, I’d probably just get annoyed by different things. I heard this from an actress once: “That was fine when I was young, but as I got older, worrying no longer suited me.” I want to be an understanding parent even when my son gets older, be two equal individuals. Maybe as part of that, continuing to work will send some sort of message someday.

Q: My oldest child — she’s four and a half — seems shy in public, but at home she’s always showing off. My younger child is two, still quite innocent, I suppose you could say, not calculating at all. So even if the two of them did the same thing, I would get angry at the older child but just think the younger was cute. The more stress I’m under, the quicker I get angry. It’s difficult. Do you get angry [at your child]?

A: I do get angry at him, but, well… I try not to get angry at him unless he is actually doing something dangerous, I suppose. And maybe there’s an element of “boys will be boys.” I use persuasion [rather than anger] as much as I can.

It might be because I was that way too. I ask myself, what would it take to get me to do this? And my answer is, I would want approval for what I was actually doing. I think we are probably similar in terms of personality. He is my child, after all.

Q: You’re so laid back about it.

A: No, I’m not. Am I?

Q: Sometimes I just lose my temper, and before I know it I’m yelling. At my kids.

A: Well, you do have two…

Q: Mm, still, I think it’s more my personality.

A: But I have been asked, “Don’t you think that was a bit harsh?” about things I’ve said. I think it was when he was two, and he threw something. I was scolding him, and they were, like, “You don’t have to be so stern, he doesn’t understand what he’s doing, after all.” But I said, “No, he understands.” At the point they said he didn’t understand, that was where I just couldn’t agree. That was just not true.

Q: When you get down to it, though, they do understand, don’t they? (laughs)

A: Oh, they understand. He’s three and a half now, and he really understands. Laid back… I might seem that way, but I’m really not. I just think it’s better to keep a sense of humor about things.

Q: Because you already have a child, after all.

A: Exactly. I have a child, and I work, so it’s better to keep a sense of humor about things. That’s probably one of my key principles. Otherwise you’re just wasting the time you have. If things go wrong, I’ll think about that then. Freelancing is the sort of job where you might not have any work in three years anyway, whether you have kids or not. I didn’t choose a job where you’re guaranteed work next year too, after all.

Parenting as “a being who’s lived just a little longer” 

Q: Finally, I’d like to ask some advice, I suppose you’d say… Well, not advice, but, you have a three-year-old, [do you have anything to say to] the working women of the world? Doesn’t have to be working women, but still (laughs).

A: (laughs) There’s nothing I can tell them.

Q: In the end, it’s the same for working fathers too, and even people who don’t have children of your own deal with people who do. So with that in mind, sorry to be so abstract, but please give me your thoughts on the topic (laughs).

A: Oh, I don’t know. I’m still working on it myself. I’m just doing the best I can, really.

I guess, like I just sort of said, be determined to do the best you can, and try not to complain. Also, I think that if you try to live your life in a way that makes you the sort of adult that children wish were around, that will cover a lot of ground, I think.

Dissatisfaction always comes from within, that’s unavoidable. When something goes wrong, take off your glasses and put on someone else’s. Shuffle things again and you can, how can I put this, retune them, decide what you want to do, think about what sort of things would be fun if you did them with your children, and interact with them as a good adult, a being who’s lived just a little longer than they have.

 

Impressions of the interview:

I felt that Tomoko was very down-to-earth, unlikely to go against the flow. My impression after doing the interview was of someone with innate talent — and who has also worked very hard, I’m sure — but who is able to put that aside and just be herself both at work and with her child.

The first time I spoke to Tomoko was over a decade ago, when I was working at J-WAVE too, on the staff of a different program. On the air she was cheerful and spoke naturally and smoothly, like a flowing river, which made an impression on me. But today, talking to her as a person and seeing her occasionally think for a while, searching for the right word, I felt once again how seriously she takes her words.

I don’t work in radio any more, and Tomoko has had a weekend program since giving birth, so for the past few years we kept in touch without actually meeting, but when I asked if she would let me interview her, she responded in the affirmative right away. I’m very grateful for her sparing the time for a personally interview that had nothing to do with her work and didn’t pay anything either (I don’t pay my interviewees).

We aren’t that far apart in age, but I feel that in terms of work Tomoko is someone far ahead of me on her career path. Thank you so much, Tomoko, for agreeing to help on such short notice.

translation: Matt Treyvaud

 

 

「しゃべる」仕事をするようになったきっかけ

 

Q:ご職業と、なぜ、その仕事をするようになったのかを教えてください。

A:メインの仕事はラジオ。J-WAVEでMCをしています。パーソナリティー、J-WAVEの場合はナビゲーターといいます。もともと、DJコンテストを受けてこの仕事に就いたというわけではなく、人の紹介で始めました。メディアに興味があったのと、演劇、音楽といった表現することに興味がありました。だけれども、わたしは父がアメリカ人で母が日本人のいわゆるハーフで、自分の生い立ち、周りの距離感の取られ方など、自分が演じたり、歌をうたったりという表現をすることは、日本では確かに向かないなと思うところがありまして

Q:例えばそれは、外見で役柄が決まったり。

A:そう、今だとアナウンサーでもハーフの人もいますけど、わたしが大学を卒業するかどうかという当時は、テレビでハーフといったらCNNヘッドラインのニュースとか、バイリンガルでニュースを読むくらいだったんです。わたしは、バイリンガルなのは自分の個性のひとつとしてしか捉えてなかったわけで、それで仕事をしたいと思っていたわけではなかったんです。

今の仕事は、結局自分が持っている視点だとか、人との距離感だとか、したいことだとか、とても合っていたんだなと十年くらい経ってから思うようになりました。たとえば、ひとの話を聞く方が向いていると思っているし、その話の中で反応していくことで個性は出せるなとある時思い、それがわたしの立ち位置として仕事で活かせるのかなと思いました。

Q:わりと根気強いですね。十年、どうなんだろうと思いながら……。

A:正直な話、最初大学卒業した時に週一で一年やったんです。それも断れなかったんです。番組やろうと言われて、背中押されて飛び込んで、泳ぎ方も知らないわけです。原稿もなく、ゲストが多い番組だったし。でも、それが当たり前だと思っているから。知らないから、他を。原稿なくてよくできるねと言われても、ええ、(他の番組は)原稿あるの!?って逆に(笑)。

最初一年間週一やって、二時間の生放送だったんですけど、終わったあとから次の放送まで悶々と反省しているわけです。そうしたら二年目に、わたし最初木曜日だったんですけど月曜から金曜の五日でお願いって言われたんです。だからそれでええ!!って。そういう感じで、二年目。だけど、やっぱり三年目になった時に、これは腹括らないで始めちゃったから、一回辞めさせて欲しい、ってお願いしたんですよ、わたし。そのあと、すとんと辞めたあとに、なんとなくラジオを聞いていた時に、わたしだったらこういう風に言いたいな、と思った時に、やっていた耳で聞いているんだと思ったんですよ。連日、生放送の中でやっていたことがばばーっと、急に整理できたんですよね。これをしたかったんだ、わたしは、と。しばらく経ってお話が来た時に、今だったらできるのかな、と思って再スタートしました。

Q:それは、自分の中で時期がある程度きたから再スタートだったんですか?それともスタッフが前一緒にやっていた人だったとかでメンツを見て決めたのか。

A:タイミングだったような気がしますね。今だったら、自分の中に軸を持ってやれる、という思いもあって。

Q:ブランク期間はどれくらいですか?

A:他の仕事はしていたんですけど、生放送っていう意味ではブランクは二年くらいかな?

Q:他のしゃべりの仕事は・・・。

A:していたんですよ。ナレーションだとか。

Q:では、ずっとしゃべりでやっていくんだろうなと思いながら?

A:うーん、そうですね。うーん・・・。ただ、生放送というのは、かなり生身や素に近いものがあるので、また他の仕事とは違うのですが、言葉は使うことは好きだったので。ものを書くことも好きだし。言葉とか、音を発するということを仕事でしていたいというのは思っていましたね。

Q:いまやキャリアは・・・。

A:二十年ちょっと。

Q:出産されたのが、何年前ですか?

A:えーと、三年半くらい前ですね。二〇一一年の十二月で、わたしが四十の時かな。

 

もともと保証がない仕事、産んだ後のことは不安でなかった

 

Q:わたしの周りでは、特にフリーランスで、子供が欲しいと思いつつも産んだあとの仕事がどうなるかわからないという先行きの不透明さから思い切れないという人が複数いるんです。業種にもよるのだろうけれど、正社員の人でも同じように思う人もいると思います。それに対する不安、心配はなかったですか?

A:嘘じゃなくて、全くなかったですね。わたし自身はどうしても産みたいと思ったわけではなく、いたら楽しいだろうなと思っていたの。でも、他にいろいろ毎日があったから、そこから逆算して、女性だったら産むのはこれまでにしておかなければとは一度も思ったことがなくて。それって出産だけじゃなくてたぶん生き方とか考え方とかなんだろうなって。

Q:産む前は、「このあとのキャリア、どうなるかな」とは深く考えなかったんですね。

A:考えなかった。考えてもしょうがないと思った。仕事も生放送は一度区切って、白紙に戻して。いつ次やるかなあ、もうやらないかなあと。正直、半分、そんな気持ちでした。仕事は好きだし、なくてはならないものなんですが、子供が健康でなければ、できないことでもあるだろうし、生まれる前から、そのあとの約束をすることは、周りにも悪いと思っていました。

Q:いま、実際に育ててみて、例えば、お迎えに行かなければいかない時間までには仕事を終えなくちゃならないし、子どもって、悪い言葉でいえば足枷じゃないですか。もちろん、足枷があるからこそ時間を効率的に使うようにすることができるけれど、大変な部分てありますよね。愛おしいし、大事だけれど。

A:大変なことは大変ですよね。そこははっきり、大変です。

Q:ふふふ。

A:大変なことは・・・自分の気持ちが一番大変なんだろうね。要するに、仕事したいと思っているけど、子どもといる時間が大事だとか、この時間が尊いとか、自分が子どもにあげられる一番のプレゼントは時間だし。それは、いつか聞いたことがあってそうだなと思っています。わたしも共働きで育っているし、働くことに疑問がないわけです。でも生まれてみたら、一緒にいたいとも思うわけよね。だけど、一緒に家にいるのは向いていないなとも思うわけ。

Q:はい、はい。

A:波がある。自分の中の波と付き合うことが一番大変だと思う、正直。大変なことは、やっぱり、自分の時間調整と気持ち調整ですかね。

こないだも沖縄に取材で三日間行ったんだけど、仕事で行くと、「仕事だけしていればいいんだ!」とびっくりしちゃうね。洗濯、掃除もしなくていいし、時間もとりあえず気にしなくていいし。

やっぱり、仕事好きなんですよね。こんなに仕事に没頭できるなんて嬉しいなって思うしね。もちろん子どもが元気なことは条件だけどね。生まれた時は、もう一生仕事できないかなと思ったけど。こんな、なんか、壊れそうなものを抱っこしちゃって。

Q:最初の三ヶ月は、大丈夫でした?わたし、1人目は睡眠が本当に少なくって。赤ちゃんがすっごい起きちゃう子で。夜中に寝ている夫を見ていると、ぼろぼろぼろと涙が・・・(笑)。

A:「なんで寝てんのよ!」って(笑)。

Q:どんなお子さんでした?

A:わたし、そこまでにはならなかったかもしれないけど。でも、疲れてたよね、やっぱりね。

Q:やっぱり細切れの睡眠じゃないですか。

A:わたし体力は割とある方で。でも自分の都合で寝られないのは確かにきついね。三時間でいいんだけど、寝ようかなという時に起こされるから。結婚前も出産前も、ある程度自分の生活を作ってきているので、それくらい強引な力がない限り、わたし、変わらなかったなと思います。

出産して、仕事で相談できるような間柄であることがすごく大事な気がすると思います。男の人でも、それまでそんな話をあまりしたことがなかったのに、ちょっとした立ち話で子供の話をしてきてくれる人が多く、びっくりしながらも、とても嬉しかったのを覚えているんですよね。

お母さんの役目の大変さをわかっている感じで、わたしも勝手に応援してもらっているように感じていたのかも(笑)。みんな持ちつ持たれつで仕事をやってるんだなと。仕事先に迷惑はかけたくないというのは礼儀として思うし一線は大事だと思うけれど、話せば意外とわかってくれようとしてくれる人がいるんだなと思う。

Q:わたし、そこをどこまで言うか悩みます。たとえば、今日も夜はイギリスと電話をする予定になっているんですけど、あちらの朝九時が日本の夕方五時で、そこから電話をすると保育園のお迎えに間に合わないわけです。で、子どもが家に帰ってきてから夕ご飯を食べさせ、寝かしつけてからの電話になると夜何時以降からしか打ち合わせができない。それを、どこまで伝えるか。わたしがお母さんであって、だから日本時間夜十時からしか電話ができないんだというか、それとも、理由は一切言わずに、単に夜十時からなら打ち合わせできると言うのかが難しいです。

A:それは、いつもお仕事をしている人?

Q:この制作会社とは前にも仕事はしていますが、プロジェクトごとに人が変わるので、今回の人とは1ヶ月前からやりとりし始めたばかり。

A:悩むよね。最初っからは言いにくいよね。仕事と別な時間、それこそ食事とかの時にチラ見できるといいかな、というのは正直あるよね。でも甘えで言うわけではたぶんなくて、自分の成果に対して「子育てしてるからこれくらいなんだ」とは絶対思われたくないし。言えば時間の融通は利かせてもらえるかもしれないけど、(内容に関しては)しっかりやるよという両方のニュアンスがあると思う。言えば、より責任が伴うから。でも、人間関係ができていれば、人間って理解しようとする生き物だと思う。子どもっていうもう一つのものが入ることによって、仕事先の人と共通言語ができると思ってもいいのかなと思います。

全然話は違うんだけど、ずっと前に沖縄の糸満に取材で、戦争の慰霊碑や資料館があるところに行ったんです。その時に聞いた話で思い出すのが、昔防空壕で隠れていた時に、新生児が生まれると泣くでしょう。泣くと居場所がばれるじゃない。だからお母さんが赤ちゃんの息を止めなさいと言われることがあったらしいんだよね。その話が頭から離れなくて。子どもが生まれて、夜中に泣く時、泣かせてあげられるって幸せなんだなと思うんです。そんなことがあったわけだし、今もどこかであるかもしれないじゃない。そういうことでいうと、守られている中で生きていて、その中で仕事と子育てと迷っているわけだから、時々、すごく小さいところで考えているんだと思う。いろいろと考えちゃうんだけど、でも、ごはんも食べられるし。人間としてどうだったらチャーミングかなというところを理想にしている。

Q:それは、子どもを産む以前から核にあったんでしょうね。

A:そうかもしれないですね。ちょっと戻りますけど、考え方って小さい頃に察知したことが今もわりと中心にあると思っている方で。わたしは引越しが多くて、友達ができても、習い事していてもどこかに動くということは、目標を決めても自分ではどうにもならないことがある。その分、行ったところでは問題なく柔軟にやってこれたのね。目の前が曇っていて、晴れたらこんないいところに来ていたんだ!という方がいいと思っていて。ちっちゃい時にそう思っていたからなのかな。だから、こういう考え方は出産したからじゃないからかもしれないですね。

Q:息子さんを何時くらいにピックアップしますか?

A:スクールへは普段は朝九時にバスのお迎えが来て、午後三時戻り。そこまでになるべくいようと思うんだけど、そうもいかない時もあるから、それはデイケア(=保育園)を延長してやってくれてるんで、今はだいたい三時、週に一、二回、四時半か五時半という感じにしてるかな。

Q:三時だったら、お昼挟むことを考えれば仕事はかなり凝縮してやらないとだめですね。迎えたら、一緒にちょっと遊んで、もう夕飯の支度。

A:そうね。本当だよね。

Q:結構ここらへんがね、へとへとになる理由(笑)。

A:ここらへんが疲れる(笑)。

Q:前、夜九時、子どもの歯磨き時間に帰ってきた夫にちょっと手伝ってと言ったら、仕事から帰ってきたんだからご飯くらいゆっくり食べさせてというわけです。そこで、ちょっと待て、わたしが二人の子とゆっくり夕ごはんを食べているとでも?と(笑)。

A:あるあるだよね。わたし、土曜生放送だから土曜日は子どもはパパと一緒にいるわけ。彼は超ポジティブ人間だから「大丈夫、おれできる」って言ってくれる。でも女の人だったら子ども見ながらごはん作って洗濯するんだけど、男性の場合帰宅したらカオスだったりするんだよね。見ててもらってありがたいんだけど。

Q:ありますね(笑)。

A:人のやり方に文句言っちゃいけないとは思うんだけど、ただこれ、全部自分にしわ寄せがいくんだよね。

Q:(男性は)やってって言ったらするけど、言われないと気づかない。毎日これわたしやってますけど、どうして気づかないんだろう。旦那さんに言ってますか?

A:言ってる、言ってるよ。でもなんか、小刻みに言うの苦手でね。一気に言っちゃうから受け止めきれないみたいだけど(笑)。でも言い方は考えなくちゃいけないと思うけどね。自分がこうしてもらいたいためにはどういう風な言い方をすればいいかな?と考える。

Q:そこはわたしも工夫しないと。いらいらして言っちゃう(笑)。

A:わたしも言っちゃうけど。まあ、理想よ、それは。でも結局、仕事辞めて家にいれば解決するかというと違うことが気になるだろうし。これはある女優さんが言っていたんだけど、若い時はそれでいいんだけど年取って悩んでいるのが似合わなくなってきたって。子どもが大きくなっても話がわかる親でいたいというか、対等な個々としていたいとは思っている。その一つとして仕事を続けていくというのはいつかは何か伝わることがあるかもしれない。

Q:うちは上の子は外面はシャイなんですけど、家にいると四歳半過ぎて本当に調子に乗ることも多くて、下は二歳、まだ純粋というか、計算していないんです。だからに人が同じことをやっても、下は可愛いねで済むところが上の子には怒っちゃう。自分に余裕がなければないほど、すぐに怒っちゃう。難しい。

(クリスさんも子どもに)怒りますか?

A:怒るには怒るけど、そうねえ。身の危険がないと怒らない、というのはあるかもしれない。男の子だから、っていうのもあるかもしれない。なるべくおだてる。

わたし、たぶん自分がそうだったから。どうやったら自分が言うこと聞くかなと思ったら、とりあえず自分がやっていることを認めてもらったほうが聞くなと思って。たぶん似てるじゃない、性格が。自分の子どもだから。

Q:余裕があるなあ。

A:余裕ないよ。あるかな?

Q:かーっとしちゃって、気づいたら怒鳴っているっていう時あるんですよね。子どもに。

A:子ども2人いるから・・・。

Q:んー、でも、わたしの性格のような気がします。

A:でも、今の言い方きついんじゃないって言われたことあったよ。二歳だったか、なんか投げてくる。そういう時に言い聞かせてたら、そんなに強く言わなくてもわからないんだから、って言われたの。でもわたしは、違うよ、わかってるよって言ったの。わかってないって言ってる時点で認めてあげてなくて、それはおかしいと。

Q:でも、結構やつらわかってますよね(笑)。

A:わかってるよ。今は三歳半だから本当にわかってきてるし。余裕ね、あるようでないんだけどね。面白がった方が勝ちかな、という感じかな。

Q:もう、(子どもが)いるから。すでにね。

A:そうなのよ。いて、仕事もやるんなら、面白がってやる方がいいよね。それは主軸にあるんでしょうね。もったいないからね、同じ時間を過ごして。ダメになったらその時は考えるんだし。フリーランスというのは、別に子どもに関わらず、もともと三年後はないかもしれない、という仕事だからね。来年仕事があるという保証がある仕事をそもそも選んでいないんだから。

 

親は一番身近な「ちょっと先を生きている生き物」

 

Q:最後、アドバイスというか・・・。アドバイスじゃないな。三歳児を抱えているということで、世の中の働くお母さん、じゃなくてもいいんですけど(笑)。

A:(笑)なんにも言えないんですけど、わたし。

Q:結局、働くお父さんでもそうだし、それから自分に子どもがいなくても何かしら子どもがいる人と関わっているじゃないですか。そういうのを踏まえ、抽象的で申し訳ないんですけど、何か一言(笑)。

A:なんだろうなあ。発展途上だから。自分も一所懸命やっているだけだからねえ。

いま、ぽろっと出たけど、一所懸命やろうと思っていることと、愚痴を言わないようにしようと思っているということ。あとは、子どもにとってこういう大人がいたらいいなと思う人たちになってあげられるように生活をしようとすると整理できる気がする。

どうしても不満って自分の中からなわけだけど、何かあった時は自分の眼鏡を外して人の眼鏡をかけてみたり。もう一回シャッフルして、チューニングできるというか、それをしたいな、していけたら子どもにとっても面白いというか、いい大人として、ちょっと先を生きている生き物として接してあげられるんじゃないかなと思います。

インタビュー感想:

フラットに、流れに逆らわずに生きているひとなんだなと思いました。そこには天賦の才能も、きっと努力もいっぱいあるのだろうけれど、それを感じさせずにありのままの「自分」で仕事にも子どもにも対するひとだというのがインタビュー後の印象です。

クリスさんと初めて言葉を交わすようになったのは、当時わたしもJ-WAVEで別の番組スタッフとして働いていた十数年前のことになります。ラジオでは明るく、まるで川の流れのように、ごく自然に、なめらかに話をされているのが印象的でした。でも、今回個人的なお話を伺うにあたり、時々「うーん」としばらく考えながら言葉を選ぶ姿に、言葉を大事にしていらっしゃるのだなと改めて思いました。

今はわたしはラジオの仕事はしておらず、クリスさんもお子さんを出産してから週末の番組を担当されるようになり、ここ数年間はたまにメッセージを交わすことはあっても実際にお会いすることはなかったのですが、今回お話聞かせていただけないかと打診すると、いいですよと即答していただきました。特に仕事上のつながりもないのに、そして報酬の発生しない(しないのです)個人的インタビューのためにお時間いただけたことを、本当に感謝しています。

年齢は大して変わらないのですが、わたしにとってクリスさんは、仕事の上でずーっと先をいく先輩という気持ちです。本当に、突然のお願い、聞いていただきありがとうございました。

追記:インタビューから一年近く経ち、クリスさんのお仕事形態もご本人の希望で変化しています。子育てと仕事のバランスの取り方が変わっていくのは当然です。だからといって全員が仕事をそう管理できるわけでもありませんが、日本が多様な働き方を認める社会を作っていけるようにと望んでいます。

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s